Gila River Projects
TODAY’S GILA RIVER IS UNDER ATTACK FROM AN INVASIVE TREE SPECIES KNOW AS THE SALT CEDAR.

El Rio Guidelines and Planning Standards

Over the past year, the Cities of Avondale, Goodyear, and Buckeye, along with Maricopa County and the Flood Control District of Maricopa County have been developing design guidelines and planning standards for future development within the El Rio Corridor that would be consistent across jurisdiction lines. The El Rio Corridor is a two to three mile wide stretch of the Gila River running 17.5 miles from its confluence with the Agua Fria River west to the State Route 85 Bridge.

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Salt Cedars are an invasive species that out-compete native cottonwood and willow

COMMUNITY COMMITMENT – RESTORE THE RIVER

Statewide, less than 10% of Arizona’s natural riparian habitat is accessible for future generations to experience.

20 years has given us an educated public, committed stakeholders and a public private commitment to solve the Gila River Flood Plain Issue.

Working with private land-owners, the Flood District of Maricopa County and the Cities of Buckeye, Avondale, and Goodyear–finding solutions to restore the river will help protect our communities and environment.

FLOOD CONTROL & ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT

WATER CONSERVATION

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FIRE PREVENTION & HABITAT RESTORATION

WATER CONSERVATION

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Saves up to 50,00 acre feet of water a year, creating a water resource in the desert

200,000 households could use the water now being depleted by salt cedar trees

300 gallons of water is absorbed by a single salt cedar tree every day

By removing salt cedar trees, 600,000 citizens can benefit from the new water resource

“For the first time in my 25-year quest, we are making strides for real change.”

 

-Mayor Jackie Meck

FIRE PREVENTION & HABITAT RESTORATION

Salt cedars are highly flammable, putting surrounding homes, critical public facilities, and cities at risk, including State Route 85, which carries traffic to and from Arizona, California and Mexico.

 

Salt cedars burn hotter than most trees, and overcrowding creates the potential for wildfires that threaten the life an property of residents.

 

Salt cedars negatively impact the habitats of endangered populations of Willow Flycatchers, Yuma Clapper Rails, and Western Yellow-Billed Cuckoo.

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FACTS

300

gallons of water absorbed by each tree each day

600k

PEOPLE WILL BENEFIT FROM WATER RESOURCES

50k

POTENTIAL ACRE FEET OF WATER SAVED A YEAR

4500

ADDED ACRES OF FLOODPLAIN

FLOOD CONTROL & ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT

The highest density of salt cedars has congested the Gila River creating the potential for backwater effect aggravating the impact of an already flood-prone area.

Adds 4,500 acres of floodplain

200 - # structures in the expanded floodplain

7,000 - acres of farm land affected by flooding in Buckeye

100 million - sq ft of reclaimed vertical land buildable space

Mitigate increased flood insurance requirements

Floodplain Use Permit is required for new development in floodplain/floodway

Developments must elevate above 1ft Water Surface Elevation (WSE)

Limited uses are permitted with the floodway

RECENT VIDEOS

Gila River Project Partners

AZ Game and FIsh Department

AZ Rock Products Association

Buckeye Water Conservation & Drainage District

Bureau of Reclamation

City of Avondale

City of Buckeye

City of Goodyear

Flood Control District of Maricopa Country

Maricopa County Planning and Development

Maricopa Farm Bureau

Gila River Regional Letter of Support

Media Inquiries

530 East Monroe Avenue Buckeye, AZ 85326

(623) 349-6974

jrogers@buckeyeaz.gov

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